Tag Archives: video

Flying the Beam

What did you do before the navigation apps on your smartphone? Just a few (OK, several) years ago we were all using paper road maps, or finding our way using local landmarks. But think about the lack of landmarks for a WWII fighter pilot navigating over open ocean toward a pinprick of an island. How […]

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P-47 and the Turbo Supercharger

You have to wonder about the engineering design advantages of a P-47 Thunderbolt airplane when WWII pilot Archie Maltbie recalls, “I flew the P-47 Thunderbolt in the 365th (Hellhawk) Fighter Group . . . and I know without doubt that I owe my life to [it].” When the schedule leading up to holiday break becomes […]

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Google Glass: A Lab on the End of your Nose

Over the summer I had the privilege of watching a 5th grader take Google Glass for a spin. The student was far faster at mastering the interface than I was, and also much more creative in his application of Google Glass. Google Glass is, well, I better let Wikipedia explain it: Google Glass (styled “GLΛSS”) is […]

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Flatten the Classroom with the iGo Microscope

Although many handheld technologies of Star Trek seem antiquated, or perhaps even steam punkish in todays world, there are still a few pieces of Treknata that we dream of. But that list just got one item shorter with the iGo wireless microscope. While not quite a Medical Tricorder, the iGo does capture the essence of […]

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Russian Meteor Fertile Ground for High Tech Exploration…On Your Classroom Computer

The fall of what is unofficially named the Chelyabinsk Meteor (soon to be meteorite) has produced a staggering number of videos. Whether police dashboard camera, cell phone, ATM camera, traffic camera, parking lot, or just one of hundreds of security cameras, clear video of the event from multiple perspectives, angles, and capture methods has packed YouTube […]

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iPad Simple Harmonic Motion with Household Parts

Simple harmonic motion is not only a foundational topic in physical science, but also a major player in many different fields from music to engineering to architecture, to sports. The iPad can be used to generate a real-time visual presentation of harmonic motion, both simple and complex, with just a few household parts and your […]

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Mini Doc Cams Capture the World Up Close

Small document cameras, or mini doc cams, are making inroads into many classrooms due to their low cost, USB power, small size, and adaptability. It is the latter feature that makes them especially attractive to science teachers. One camera in particular is the IPEVO Point 2 View USB document camera. Since the camera connects to […]

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Must-see TED videos

TED.com provides “Riveting talks by remarkable people, free to the world,” as videos (streaming, downloadable, podcasts, etc.) captured during the conferences. TED stands for Technology, Entertainment, and Design. Here are some of my favorite TED videos, and this list corresponds to the list published in our Science 2.0 column this month along with a few […]

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Videos for instruction

YouTube is an amazing resource, with videos on just about any topic. There are animations, videos of demonstrations that you might not be able to do in your classroom, and records of talks by famous scientists. The SciLinks webwatchers have been including them as teacher resources in SciLinks for several reasons: Some of the comments […]

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Dance of the planets

All you earlybirds out there are in for a treat this month if you look eastward just before dawn (and the weather is clear).  Four planets will be engaged in a slow-motion dance, aligning themselves differently day by day in a tight segment of the sky. NASA has created a nice video describing the phenomenon:

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