Tag Archives: physics

Waves and electromagnetic radiation






As the Science Scope editor notes, “Most of our students—and many adults—take modern technology for granted, never wondering how these machines work or what science makes them possible.” Much of this science relates to waves and electronic radiation, and the featured articles in this issue have many ideas for student investigations in these topics, and […]

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iPad Simple Harmonic Motion with Household Parts






Simple harmonic motion is not only a foundational topic in physical science, but also a major player in many different fields from music to engineering to architecture, to sports. The iPad can be used to generate a real-time visual presentation of harmonic motion, both simple and complex, with just a few household parts and your […]

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Five things you should put on your iPad Camera






The tablet computer like the iPad can be a magic box of inquiry. For instance, it has a camera, and in particular a front facing camera. Why that is important is because students can manipulate objects on the camera and collectively view the results. And of course you can, with the touch of a finger, […]

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iPad Science Exploration: Visualizing Brainwave Entrainment






Brainwave entrainment or “brainwave synchronization,” is any practice that aims to cause brainwave frequencies to fall into step with a periodic stimulus having a frequency corresponding to the intended brain-state (at least according to Wikipedia). I have a fascinating App on my iPad called simply Headache.  It’s introduction in the App Store reports, “Advanced Brainwave […]

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Wrapping Up the Old Year, Preparing for the New Year






We’ve heard that after the school year ends, many teachers spend time catching up on NSTA Reports articles they didn’t have a chance to read thoroughly earlier. To help you make the most of this precious downtime, here’s a selection of 2011–2012 stories we think you’ll enjoy reading—or re-reading.






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Off to the races with physics!






I enjoyed watching auto races as a child, so I decided to check out Norm Barstow’s session, Elastic Power: Wind Up Your Engines and Explore (a.k.a. “NASCAR in New Orleans”).






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Picture-perfect elementary STEM






This morning in New Orleans, as part of the Urban Science Education Leadership (USEL) session, presenters from the Baltimore City Public Schools described their district’s Elementary STEM Teacher Clinic and how it transformed the teachers who participated in it.






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Science Lessons From History






Find out how and why science educators around the country are integrating history in their science lessons to help students make connections to their world.






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Are your high school students WORTHY?






Know a freshman or sophomore majoring in physics, engineering, computer science, or math who has a solid 3.0 GPA? Northrop Grumman’s WORTHY program has much to offer him or her.






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Force and motion and humor






NSTA Press author Bill Robertson has extended his popular Stop Faking It! series with the new teacher resource Companion Classroom Activities for Stop Faking It! Force and Motion (Grades 5–9). Teachers have responded enthusiastically to the lively mix of clear explanations and irreverent humor that are the hallmarks of Robertson’s original series. In the new […]

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