Tag Archives: lesson plan

Science of Golf: meteorology

Living near Tampa—the so-called “lightning capital”—and having a college-golfer (and budding engineer) daughter who plays daily, I’m always a bit jittery about localized storms that pop up regularly here during the summer. With a 60% chance of t-storms this afternoon, she says she’ll keep tabs with a couple of weather apps, and as long as […]



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Science of Golf: Newton 1 & 2

From 0 to 175 mph in a fraction of a second, today’s top golfers can turn a golf ball into one of the fastest projectiles in sports. Science of Golf: Newton’s First and Second Laws of Motion showcases the insights of Suzann Pettersen, a professional golfer on the LPGA Tour who turns force and motion […]



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Science of Golf: dimples

Think of it as a linear particle accelerator, but instead of atoms, golf balls are propelled at speeds up to 200 miles per hour through a corridor that is 70 feet long and banked with infrared sensors. That’s the tool the United States Golf Association (USGA) Research and Test Center uses to test golf balls. […]



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Science of Golf: potential and kinetic energy

For the first time ever, the women are playing their U.S. Open on the same course as the men. Watch 2010 U.S. Women’s Open champ Paula Creamer in Science of Golf: Potential and Kinetic Energy to see the energy transformations they’ll use to power the ball down the tricky course. Creamer says, “You’re so much […]



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Science of Golf: agronomy

Pinehurst No.2, the site of the 2014 U.S. Open, was not the lush, green, wall-to-wall carpet that most people expect to see at one of golf’s majors. This year’s U.S. Open featured green only near the center of the fairways with browning turfgrass and scraggly “native areas” on their flanks. But all of that was […]



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Science of Golf: torque and moment of inertia

Welcome back to the Science of Golf! U.S. Open play is underway at Pinehurst No.2 in central North Carolina! This year’s Science of Golf series reunites NBC Learn with the United States Golf Association (USGA) and Chevron to bring you the science, technology, engineering, and math behind the sport. And once again, NSTA has developed […]



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Science of golf: volume and displacement

Further your STEM efforts with the Science of Golf video series from the partnership of NBC Learn, the United States Golf Association (USGA), Chevron, and NSTA. As the governing body for the sport, one aspect of the USGA’s role is to regulate and test all golf equipment for conformance to the Rules of Golf. In […]



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Chemistry of soap and detergents

Slippery, slathery, sparkly soap. We squirt a dollop on our hands, rub it in timed to the birthday song, rinse off, and our hands are squeaky clean. But what is soap, and why does it work? Soaps first appeared in recorded history several thousand years ago, and undoubtedly, the substance was around for some time […]



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Chemistry Now, week 8: cheeseburger chemistry: tomato

How does a tomato go from green, marble-like sphere to juicy red brilliance? Chemistry, that’s how. In the case of tomatoes, the plant bathes the fruit in ethylene molecules when the fruit reaches an edible size, and this hormone triggers the fruit to ripen. We are into week eight of the weekly, online, video series […]



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