Category Archives: Science 2.0

The Science 2.0 blog is all about digital tools for your classroom. Click on a headline to read the entire post.

Start Your App Search With a Question






In this video, columnists Ben Smith and Jared Mader share information from their Science 2.0 column, “Start Your App Search With a Question,” that appeared in the Summer issue of The Science Teacher. Read the article here.

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Get Lost in the Magic of Learning with the Celestron Flipview Digital Microscope






One of the wonderful things about the amazing science education technology available to teachers today is that the tech can disappear—in a good way. The Celestron Flipview digital microscope is one of them. Celestron, as a company can trace its roots back to 1955, but the magic of of optics goes back to the 15th century. […]

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Go Big with Vernier’s Go Wireless pH Sensor

Go Big with Vernier’s Go Wireless pH Sensor  pH, like time and temperature, is a physical characteristic that is tossed around daily in science class but rarely understood on a deeper level. In short, time is a measurement of change; temperature is a measurement of relative motion; and pH is the negative log of the […]

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Formative Assessment with Online Tools






In this video, columnists Ben Smith and Jared Mader share information from their Science 2.0 column, “Formative Assessment with Online Tools,” that appeared in a recent issue of The Science Teacher. Read the article here: http://bit.ly/1HbwZq1

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Fun and Science with the Weatherhawk myMET digital Windmeter






The Weatherhawk myMET Windmeter  Measuring wind speed is just one of the many facets of exploring climate science. Wind, or the natural noticeable movement of air is created and changed by many well-known factors including temperature, barometric pressure, landscape, and time of day among others. The use of a digital anemometer allows students to put […]

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Collaborating to Collect Data






In this video, columnists Ben Smith and Jared Mader share information from their Science 2.0 column, “Collaborative Data Collection,” that appeared in a recent issue of The Science Teacher. Read the article here: http://bit.ly/1B0g6Zr

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Flipping Tools for the Science Classroom






In this video, columnist and educator Jared Mader shares information from the Science 2.0 column, “Flipping Tools for the Science Classroom,” that appears in the March 2015 issue of The Science Teacher. Read the article here: http://bit.ly/1AddCXp

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Connect With Students via Mobile Devices






In this video, columnist and physics teacher Ben Smith shares information from the Science 2.0 column, “Be Accessible via Mobile Devices,” that appeared in the February 2015 issue of The Science Teacher. Read the article here: http://bit.ly/1EYaplW

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The Pasco Wireless Dissolved Oxygen Probe VS. Winter Water






The power of a Bluetooth-connected Dissolved Oxygen probe is not only from the DO data, but the places the data can be collected, and the ways the data is presented. Over the holidays I took the Pasco wireless DO probe up in the mountains to generate some data and answer some questions. Since my winter/spring lesson plans […]

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The Vernier Motion Encoder System: Motion Encoding Made Personal

cart-n-sensor





The Vernier Motion Encoder System marks a significant shift in the science teacher’s ability to transition between the conceptual, formula-based physics of motion to the “real world” application of those concepts and formulas—and here’s the big news—without the need for disclaimers explaining away anomalous data, inconsistent graphs, and the general background noise of low resolution […]

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