Author Archives: Judy Elgin Jensen

Science of Golf: Newton 1 & 2






From 0 to 175 mph in a fraction of a second, today’s top golfers can turn a golf ball into one of the fastest projectiles in sports. Science of Golf: Newton’s First and Second Laws of Motion showcases the insights of Suzann Pettersen, a professional golfer on the LPGA Tour who turns force and motion […]

Posted in Videos and Lessons | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Science of Golf: dimples






Think of it as a linear particle accelerator, but instead of atoms, golf balls are propelled at speeds up to 200 miles per hour through a corridor that is 70 feet long and banked with infrared sensors. That’s the tool the United States Golf Association (USGA) Research and Test Center uses to test golf balls. […]

Posted in Videos and Lessons | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Science of Golf: potential and kinetic energy






For the first time ever, the women are playing their U.S. Open on the same course as the men. Watch 2010 U.S. Women’s Open champ Paula Creamer in Science of Golf: Potential and Kinetic Energy to see the energy transformations they’ll use to power the ball down the tricky course. Creamer says, “You’re so much […]

Posted in Videos and Lessons | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Science of Golf: agronomy






Pinehurst No.2, the site of the 2014 U.S. Open, was not the lush, green, wall-to-wall carpet that most people expect to see at one of golf’s majors. This year’s U.S. Open featured green only near the center of the fairways with browning turfgrass and scraggly “native areas” on their flanks. But all of that was […]

Posted in Videos and Lessons | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Science of Golf: torque and moment of inertia






Welcome back to the Science of Golf! U.S. Open play is underway at Pinehurst No.2 in central North Carolina! This year’s Science of Golf series reunites NBC Learn with the United States Golf Association (USGA) and Chevron to bring you the science, technology, engineering, and math behind the sport. And once again, NSTA has developed […]

Posted in Videos and Lessons | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Science of the Winter Olympics: Stability & Vibration






You think the 2014 Winter Olympic Games are over? Not by a long shot. Glue your eyes back on NBC for the Paralympic Winter Games March 7–16. There, you’ll watch Iraq war veteran and Paralympian Heath Calhoun take advantage of the same technology as off-road motorcyclists do to reduce the vibrations that result when you […]

Posted in Videos and Lessons | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Science of the Winter Olympics: Movement & Robotics






Did you see an Olympic performance (perhaps Davis & White’s gold-medal ice dance) that looked so perfect, so flawless, that it seemed almost robotic? If so, you’ll want to watch Olympic Movement & Robotic Design—another installment in the Science and Engineering of the 2014 Winter Olympic Games from NBC Learn and NSF. It’s amazing the […]

Posted in Videos and Lessons | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Science of the Winter Olympics: Physics of Figure Skating






Many would call the figure skating events the most elegant of all of the winter Olympic sports. The spins. The tosses. The leaps. How on earth do they stay in balance? Find out by watching the latest installment of the Science and Engineering of the 2014 Winter Olympic Games, the video series created by NBC […]

Posted in Videos and Lessons | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Science of the Winter Olympics: Faster & Safer Bobsleds






Controlled violence. That’s what Steve Langton of the U.S. Bobsled Team calls his sport, in which he’s huddled in a bullet-shaped, finned shell made of carbon fiber and Kevlar hurtling down a curving track at speeds over 70 miles per hour. The team’s bobsled designer, Michael Scully of BMW DesignWorks USA, agrees based on a […]

Posted in Videos and Lessons | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Science of the Winter Olympics: Science of Snow






SUPERCOOL! More than just an expression, this state of water figures prominently in snow formation. Find out more about snow and how snow conditions might impact winter Olympians whose gold medals are inextricably linked to this frozen base material. Sarah Konrad—a glaciologist and a former Olympian—gives us a unique perspective on the Science of Snow, […]

Posted in Videos and Lessons | Tagged , , | Leave a comment