Ed News: STEM: What’s Holding Females Back?

News Roundup banner

This week in education news, Amazon announces new Amazon Future Engineer initiative; research project at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville is exploring the use of flipped teaching in STEM courses; NASBE implores states to focus on the lowest-performing students in ESSA plans; music matters to STEM students; 2016 National Teacher of the Year elected to the U.S. House of Representatives; environmentalists are hoping that Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson will bring science back to the House science committee when she takes over as chair in the next Congress; the U.S. Department of Education will continue to focus on plugging “leaks” in the STEM education pipeline; research finds small benefits to small classes; and personalized learning has a big problem.

Amazon Future Engineer Program Expands STEM Access to Low-Income Student

As computer science jobs continue opening with too few college graduates possessing the necessary skills, Amazon announced Thursday its Amazon Future Engineer initiative, which will help “inspire, educate and train children and young adults from underserved and low-income communities to pursue careers in computer science,” according to a news release. Read the brief featured in Education DIVE.

STEM: What’s Holding Females Back?

While the 20th century saw women stride ahead in their participation in education and the workforce, there are still gender differences apparent in some areas of education. In particular, females do not enroll in higher mathematics, science, or ICT, or move into STEM-based careers to the same extent as males. Read the article featured in Teacher Magazine.

Researchers to Explore Flipped Teaching in STEM Courses

A research project at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville is exploring the use of flipped teaching in STEM courses. Supported by a $598,402 grant from the National Science Foundation, the three-year project will help STEM faculty at SIUE and St. Louis Community College implement flipped teaching in their courses and examine both faculty and student experiences with the method. Read the article featured in Campus Technology.

NASBE Urges States to Focus on Lowest-Performing Students in ESSA Plans

While most states are taking advantage of the Every Student Succeeds Act’s (ESSA) flexibility to use academic growth measures as part of their accountability systems, only nine states are applying a separate growth measure to the lowest-performing groups of students, according to a new policy brief from the National Association of State Boards of Education (NASBE). Read the brief featured in Education DIVE.

Why Music Matters to STEM Students. Yes, STEM.

Full self-disclosure — I’m a “bandie!” In junior high school, band provided me with a safe haven during the challenging years of adolescence. Band was essential to my emerging identity and to building my self-confidence. But wait, didn’t I become a physics teacher, and then a teacher educator in a teaching program focused on STEM? Double yes. Read the article featured in Study International News.

In Historic Win, Nationally Recognized Teacher Jahana Hayes Elected to U.S. House

Jahana Hayes, the 2016 National Teacher of the Year, has won her race for a U.S. House seat, representing Connecticut’s 5th district. A former high school history teacher and current district administrator, Hayes, a Democrat, will be the first black woman from the state to serve in Congress. Read the article featured in Education Week.

All Eyes on Top Democrat to Bring Science Back to Science Committee

Environmentalists are hoping that Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson (D-Texas) will bring science back to the House science committee when she takes over as chair in the next Congress. Johnson, if elected chair, will be the first woman with a degree in a STEM field to hold the position since 1990. Read the article featured in The Hill.

U.S. Department of Education Fulfills Administration Promise to Invest $200 Million in STEM Education

The U.S. Department of Education announced that it has not only fulfilled but surpassed President Trump’s directive to invest $200 million in high-quality STEM, including computer science, education. In total, the Department obligated $279 million in STEM discretionary grant funds in Fiscal Year 2018. Read the press release.

Despite Popularity with Parents and Teachers, Review of Research Finds Small Benefits to Small Classes

Small classes are very popular with parents. Fewer kids in a room can mean more personal attention for their little ones. Teachers like them too. Fewer kids mean fewer tests to mark and fewer disruptions. Read the article featured in The Hechinger Report.

What Does Personalized Learning Mean? Whatever People Want It To

Personalized learning has a big problem. Inside America’s schools, the term is used to mean just about anything. Algorithm-driven playlists? Grouping students based on digital data? Letting teens design projects based on their personal interests? Adaptive software that adjusts to each student’s skill level? Customized activities to help kids develop a growth mindset? Read the article featured in Education Week.

Stay tuned for next week’s top education news stories.

The Communication, Legislative & Public Affairs (CLPA) team strives to keep NSTA members, teachers, science education leaders, and the general public informed about NSTA programs, products, and services and key science education issues and legislation. In the association’s role as the national voice for science education, its CLPA team actively promotes NSTA’s positions on science education issues and communicates key NSTA messages to essential audiences.

The mission of NSTA is to promote excellence and innovation in science teaching and learning for all.


Follow NSTA

Facebook icon Twitter icon LinkedIn icon Pinterest icon G+ icon YouTube icon Instagram icon
This entry was posted in Education News Roundup and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Trackbacks are closed, but you can post a comment.

Post a Comment

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

*
*