Ideas and inspiration from NSTA’s October 2017 K-12 journals

Having just completed an online course on climate change, I was interested in the Commentary: Why the Scientific Consensus on Climate Change Matters for Science Education, from The Science Teacher, and the important role science teachers play in helping students understand this global issue.

The featured articles in Science Scope and The Science Teacher focus on climate change. Both journals have excellent ideas to help students understand the local relevance of this global issue, with lessons that could be adapted for different grade levels.

Science Scope – Climate Change

From the Editor’s Desk: Tackling the Complex Issue of Climate Change: “…teaching climate change as if it were a debatable topic sends the message to students that it is acceptable to ignore scientific evidence and theories. The controversial nature of climate change is therefore exactly why we must teach it; to do so will help our students learn how to evaluate scientific information for the purpose of helping responsible citizens make informed consumer and voter decisions.”

Articles in this issue that describe lessons include a helpful sidebar (“At a Glance”) documenting the big idea, essential pre-knowledge, time, and cost. The lessons also include connections with the NGSS, and many follow a 5E format and include examples of student work and classroom materials.

These monthly columns continue to provide background knowledge and classroom ideas:

For more on the content that provides a context for projects and strategies described in this issue, see the SciLinks topics Bats, Carbon Cycle, Change in Climate, Ecosystems, Food Webs, Geologic Time Scale, Greenhouse Effect, Ice, Ocean Currents, Photosynthesis, Sea Level Change, Sonar, Wind Currents

 Continue for The Science Teacher and Science & Children.

The Science Teacher – Teaching About Climate Change

Editor’s Corner: Hot Topic: “Climate change is one of the great moral imperatives of our time. Science teachers must provide students with the accurate knowledge that can inspire them to take action on a personal, community, and global level.”

The lessons described in the articles include connections with the NGSS and many include illustrations of student work.

These monthly columns continue to provide background knowledge and classroom ideas:

For more on the content that provides a context for projects and strategies described in this issue, see the SciLinks topics Atmospheric Pressure, Carbon Cycle, Climate Change, Ecosystem, Endosymbiosis, Homeostasis, Osmosis, Sea Level Change, Symbiosis

Science & Children – Early Childhood Life Science

Editor’s Note: Revisiting the Framework: A Clear Pathway: “Of all the sciences, life science is probably the one that is most familiar and comfortable for early childhood educators. It is easily accessible to children and relatable—a good place to start using the tools of the Framework and NGSS.”

Children are naturally curious and enjoy learning and investigating. The Guest Editorial: How to Integrate STEM Into Early Childhood Education has the results of an examination of STEM environments for young learners and recommendations for educators and parents.

The lessons described in the articles have a chart showing connections with the NGSS and many includes illustrations of student work .

These monthly columns continue to provide background knowledge and classroom ideas:

For more on the content that provides a context for projects and strategies described in this issue, see the SciLinks topics Adaptations of Animals, Amphibians, Characteristics of Living Things, Classification, Pollination, Reptiles, Seasons, Seed Germination, What Are the Parts of a Plant?

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