Where are you reading Science and Children this summer?

Teacher holding up a copy of Science and Children in front of a lake and mountains in Glacier National Park.A family trip took me to a new and breathtaking location—Glacier National Park. We went before the Reynolds Creek Wildland fire started but evidence of past burns and avalanches was dramatic. The trip also provided the moments I needed away from daily chores to thoroughly read the July issue of Science and Children. Where have you been reading Science and Children this summer? 

Send me a picture of your copy of Science and Children (and you, if you’d like) in your favorite summer location—a beach, your backyard, the neighbor’s pool, a fab museum or on lunch break at your summer job, and I’ll add them to this post. Send your picture of Science and Children to theearlyyearsnsta at gmail dot com.

Send me a picture of your copy of Science and Children (with you, if you’d like to be part of the picture) in your favorite summer location—a beach, your backyard, the neighbor’s pool, a fab museum or on lunch break at your summer job, and I’ll add them to this post.

Here’s a bit about just a few of the many interesting articles in the summer issue:

In “Dig Into Fossils!”, an article free to all, Lisa Borgerding writes about the “big ideas” she introduces to preschool and kindergarten students in a science-focused camp:

  • Fossils are the remains of organisms that used to be alive a long time ago.
  • We make inferences about fossil organisms’ form, function, and habitats based on observations.
  • Fossils can be similar to organisms alive today.

Jyoti Gopal writes about her kindergarten class’s investigation into the taste, color and origin of foods as they tasted their way through the alphabet, in “Eating the Alphabet: Using a daily morning routine to link science, math, literacy, and social studies in a kindergarten classroom” (pgs 50-58). Have you ever tasted a tamarind, tzatziki or turnip?

Editor Linda Froschauer gives tips on how to accomplish an instructional sequence that supports a valid learning progression and can be followed by our learning community in her Editor’s Note: Identifying a Progression of Learning.

If you’d rather read it on your digital device, see the choices here.

Happy reading!

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